Promoting Your Book

As anyone out there reading my blog knows, I’ve been reading a lot lately about the marketing side of the book publishing business.  Over the last few months I’ve read Gary Vaynerchuck’s Crush It!, Steve Weber’s Plug Your Book, and Tim Ferriss’ The Four Hour Work Week.

Yesterday I had a chance to listen to an interview of Jack Canfield, the incredibly successful co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series.  The subject was book promotion, but he was also there to help promote Bill and Steve Harrison’s Quantum Leap Publicity and Marketing Program.  Canfield has written a number of other books about using the law of attraction and the benefits of visualization and Focus to achieving goals.  These concepts aren’t new, as Canfield himself acknowledges, but he has a knack for presenting them in a way that inspires and energizes.

When asked by Harrison what one idea he’d like the listeners to take away, Canfield replied that the most important thing an author can do is write a great book and then learn to market it.  Invest in your education.  If you write a great book and then fail to promote it, it’s like giving birth and then throwing the baby in the garbage.

This stark image got my attention.  He likened the creation and marketing of a book to yin and yang:  the female creative principle and the male urge to go out into the world.  Since I rather like Asian philosophy this concept of balance appeals to me and may help overcome my introverted reticence to blow my own horn.

For me, the most important take away was the admonishment to Dream Big.  A big dream, in either writing or life, is much much more inspiring than a small one.  Listening to Canfield, I realized I’d been whittling my dreams down over the last few years, and I’d grown disinterested in them.  If I’m going to work hard, I’d rather work toward a big dream that gives me joy, than a small one.

What do you think?

2 Comments

Filed under Life, writing

2 responses to “Promoting Your Book

  1. Benita

    I’ve got very mixed feelings about the whole “Law of Attraction” bit.

    From a scientific perspective, people’s reports of success are anecdotal and people tend to report successes and keep failures to themselves. Plus those who “fail” to attract something are told that they didn’t do it quite right…since there is always more you can do to perfect your vision. Its a bit like faith healing. You either get healed or get told that your faith wasn’t strong enough.

    On the other hand, of course clarifying your goals is going to help make progress towards them. Especially if that clarification involves the steps up to the grand goal. And as a writer there is a big difference between wanting to speak with your own voice and wanting to write for publication. Sometimes they coincide, sometimes they don’t, so you better know what you are aiming for.

    • I agree that the Law of Attraction has some scientific holes in it. People often overlook the failures. Or, as mentioned in another book I read by Canfield, the thing attracted may not show up for months or years. Somehow it doesn’t seem to be very effective as a technique if it takes that long. At that point, how do you know it’s the Attraction and not the 99 other things you were doing to bring your wish about?

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